Monday, November 03, 2008

Let's Look At Some Graphic Novel Posts

For the last few weeks I've been staying on task with writing much better than usual because I've been trying to treat it as a practice and think of myself as in training. While I have no problem blowing off work to zone out on the Internet, it seems that I can take training far more seriously. I've been staying away from the computer card games for a couple of weeks now.

The unfortunate flipside of this is that while I'm working better, I'm not able to keep up as well with all the blogs I follow or my listservs. So today I'm going to try to do a round-up of posts I've been missing on the graphic novels nominated for a Cybil.

Both Pink Me and A Fuse #8 Production reviewed Chiggers by Hope Larson.

Parenthetical.net reviewed Magic Trixie by Jill Thompson.

Parenthetical.net also reviewed Rapunzel's Revenge by Shannon Hale.

Sam at Parenthetical.net has been incredibly busy, also reviewing In the Small by Michael Hague.

And then Oz and Ends has a post on Camp Babymouse, by Jennifer L. Holm and Matthew Holm, which was a Cybil nominee in 2007.

3 comments:

Anamaria (bookstogether) said...

Thanks for pointing me to that post about Magic Trixie. I stumbled across it while looking for witch books for my daughter on Amazon, and the only reason I idn't pick it up was because I haven't figured out how to read graphic novels aloud yet. Can it be done??

gail said...

What an excellent question! I will look into that.

YNL said...

Graphic novels are very good for emerging readers - grownup and child can take on each character - and there are now some graphic novel easy readers (the books from TOON especially), but in general, a book like Magic Trixie, heavy on the dialogue, can be kind of a pain to read out loud.

Great books for 1st/2nd graders (which Magic Trixie is) can be hard to find, and while it's tempting to read all the good ones now, there's nothing wrong with putting off a title for a couple years, until she can read it herself. You will thank yourself later!

For now, there are wordless GN's that are terrific to share with a pre-reader. Korgi by Christian Slade, Yam by Corey Barba, and Owly spring to mind. They get a child used to interpreting narrative for herself, without those pesky words getting in the way!